PyroFox55

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fowlie:

If you enjoy Fritz Fargo, please consider helping to support it through Patreon! 

Patreon lets fans support their favorite creators by becoming patrons. Unlike other fundraising services, which raise for a single big event, Patreon is for creators who create a stream of smaller works.

You can chose to donate as much or as little money as you like, either for every page I upload, just a few, or just once a month.  With your help, I hope to be able to keep to a more consistent update schedule, and eventually move to uploading multiple pages a week.  Your contributions would not only help pay for the materials needed for traditional comic art, but also make it possible to reduce hours at my day job, so I can spend more time on drawing pages.  
Of course, I’m not asking for something for nothing.  Aside from the warm feeling you get from helping me, every $1+ Patron will be given access to a fun three page, Patreon exclusive Fritz comic!  (to be released at the end of June)
$5 patrons will get to enjoy blog posts filled with sketches, previews and other goodies, as well as a monthly Podcast!  Each episode will take you through each chapter of Fritz, talking about changes, inspirations and answering any questions you may have!  (first one up now!)
All $10 patrons will get all of the above, as well as a bust commission of a character of their choice!  (Commissions to be collected end of June)
Please consider supporting Fritz Fargo on Patreon, every little bit helps, and I will be eternally grateful! 

fowlie:

If you enjoy Fritz Fargo, please consider helping to support it through Patreon! 

Patreon lets fans support their favorite creators by becoming patrons. Unlike other fundraising services, which raise for a single big event, Patreon is for creators who create a stream of smaller works.

You can chose to donate as much or as little money as you like, either for every page I upload, just a few, or just once a month.  With your help, I hope to be able to keep to a more consistent update schedule, and eventually move to uploading multiple pages a week.  Your contributions would not only help pay for the materials needed for traditional comic art, but also make it possible to reduce hours at my day job, so I can spend more time on drawing pages.  

Of course, I’m not asking for something for nothing.  Aside from the warm feeling you get from helping me, every $1+ Patron will be given access to a fun three page, Patreon exclusive Fritz comic!  (to be released at the end of June)

$5 patrons will get to enjoy blog posts filled with sketches, previews and other goodies, as well as a monthly Podcast!  Each episode will take you through each chapter of Fritz, talking about changes, inspirations and answering any questions you may have!  (first one up now!)

All $10 patrons will get all of the above, as well as a bust commission of a character of their choice!  (Commissions to be collected end of June)

Please consider supporting Fritz Fargo on Patreon, every little bit helps, and I will be eternally grateful! 

coelasquid:

I feel like this video is a good summary of the constant terror that internet creative types live in, and is important for said creative types as well as folks who consume creative content created by others to consider.

do you think umineko is a story about forgiving abusers?

Anonymous

akatokuro:

that’s not the way i would personally frame it - i think it is clear that one of umineko’s no. 1 thematic projects is exploring the mindsets of bad people who do bad things, and examining why they do those things and how they often stem from personal experiences or pain. and i would say it puts forth the idea that “understanding” in that sense can work towards diluting hatred, and moving on without “continuing the cycle.” there are some ways i honestly love that theme - a friend on tumblr mentioned once that umineko actually gave them hope in a strange way, because it provided insight that oftentimes even though bad people exist, that people who do genuinely terrible things exist, they’re still human beings who can be understood.

i also think that theme is valuable in terms of sort of—“checking myself,” if that makes any sense? battler’s crimes, which stem from basic ignorance and self-centeredness, are given huge focus, and those are “crimes” that any of us can commit (and we can hope that we take them as well as battler eventually did) - but in exploring rosa’s mindset so intimately, and the way she justifies herself to herself, even though i’m fairly sure i haven’t done anything as outright awful as rosa, i can still recognize shades of myself and my own thinking patterns in there. when i’m in a bad, resentful, self-pitying place. the same with eva, and even sometimes with kinzo. so that’s also something that’s valuable to me.

but there are some ways i feel wary of the way ryukishi can push it too far—eva and ange’s portrayal in ep8 made me really, really uncomfortable, for example, and i’m speaking as someone who was touched/affected by the introduction of “eva tried to love ange at first” in the witch’s tanabata. ryukishi’s works are the strongest in this sense to me when they’re relatively open about confronting the reader with the ugliness of what a character has done, exploring a mindset that allowed it, and then basically asking the readers about how they’ll respond to it. i actually really appreciate that yes, yasu for example outright intended to do a fucking terrible, horrific thing, for her own sake, but the story still “challenges” us in the sense of asking if we can sympathize with her. i think it’s the same with the characters who are guilty of abuse, like eva, rosa, and kinzo.

i’m not as comfortable when it feels like umineko skirts the line of “hahaha but you don’t know that happened so maybe they didn’t do anything wrong at all!” (will forever side-eye ryukishi about some of his interview comments regarding kinzo) and, yes, the question of that “response” is a completely personal thing that everyone needs to and has the right to decide for themselves. there are times when i’ve felt that ryukishi found a certain character’s actions basically forgivable, where i absolutely did not. i’m in a place where i usually feel okay “disagreeing” with ryukishi, but there’s also nothing remotely wrong with someone’s response or feelings if they feel the narrative went too easy on certain characters in ways that were personally upsetting to them.

(although for me, probably the one ryukishi work that made me outright rage in terms of FORGIVENESS!!! though was higanbana’s second chapter! all of the NOPE and actual disgust there - and that’s probably partially informed by the idea of stalking/being watched/terrorized in that way being a huge HAHAHAHA NOPE thing for me personally)

but i think umineko is a lot of ways ryukishi coming up with - or exploring - his own answer to the question he posed at the end of meakashi: the question of whether you could sympathize with shion, or rather, if you were going to be murdered, if there was any kind of murderer that you would be able to forgive. higurashi ends up softening the blow of a lot of the characters’ terrible actions through the hinamizawa syndrome, but umineko went the route of exploring all kinds of terrible people and terrible actions. but even though there are times when i think it missteps very badly, i do think umineko at least tries to place more of an emphasis on “understanding” in a relatively neutral way, as opposed to being in that place of the most important question is if we decide/judge as readers CAN THIS PERSON BE FORGIVEN OR NOT YES/NO.

i mean, umineko at its deepest core is about exploring the feelings, suffering, and pain of a mass murderer, whose mass murder plans included terrorizing her victims before they died, killing pretty unrelated people and killing a child who unconditionally trusted her, for basically self-centered reasons. it doesn’t shy away from that, and i actually appreciate it for going all-out with it! it personally is obviously sympathetic to her. i’m obviously incredibly sympathetic to her, and personally would forgive her - but “understanding” this mass murderer, and the other terrible people in umineko like those who abuse others, would be more of what i’d say umineko’s intent is, as opposed to necessarily “forgiving.” ryukishi has said that those actions are “of course unforgivable,” even though his enormous sympathy for their circumstances is obvious, but it’s like that’s sort of beside the point of what he’s trying to explore. but i can understand being troubled if sometimes it feels like those lines become too blurred. 

Jun 8
bouncybat:

artist-refs:

Animal noses comparison by ~Mikan-no-Tora

Okay, this exists, so no one has an excuse to put a dog nose on everything anymore.

bouncybat:

artist-refs:

Animal noses comparison by ~Mikan-no-Tora

Okay, this exists, so no one has an excuse to put a dog nose on everything anymore.

blankd:

I’m sure this is what you watch my tumblr for.

Apr 9

Herodias

(Source: frigwiggin)

fowlie:

fowlart:

Opening sequence to Light My Fire, Chapter Seven of Fritz Fargo

hey guys, got my art blog up and running.  I just put the art I liked the most on it, and I’ll still be uploading everything here, its just for like.. linking people to and shit.  

Hey, you guys should all check out Fowlie’s sweet art!

If you were a ghost what would you spend your time doing? Aside from perving hot guys in the shower.

demisnowflake:

I would NEVER. I’d probably do really boring things like watch theatre movies for free, visit cool tourist places and historical sites for free, possess celebrities and then eat a bunch of chipotle and beans before award ceremonies just for fun, go on all the theme park rides I want for free. Stuff like that.

fowlie:

I’ve been busy doing some work for my local Free Comic Book Day flyer.  Here’s Tintin and Captain Haddock I did last night instead of working on Fritz.  

fowlie:

I’ve been busy doing some work for my local Free Comic Book Day flyer.  Here’s Tintin and Captain Haddock I did last night instead of working on Fritz.  

Do you have any advice on trying to have a decent conversation when someone is being hostile to the topic at hand? I generally wouldn't bother but it's important to me that they at last hear me out. But I'm afraid to try and end up hurt.

the-real-seebs:

Many things here.

First, spend some time considering your goals, and the acceptable risks. A lot of possible pain that might result will be much more tolerable if it’s a risk you considered and accepted going in.

Second, think about how sneaky you do or don’t want to be. My advice: Framing things to bring them up in a way that gets useful results is good, lying is probably bad. If you want to be heard, be sure what you say is true.

In general, people who are hostile to a topic have defenses up, which means they are at risk of Feeling Bad. You do not want to make them feel bad, because feeling bad will bring the defenses up. So! You want to find a way to talk about this that isn’t about them, and isn’t about the way they identify either. So, for instance, if you’ve got a Republican friend and you want to argue with them about their politics, don’t start by telling them that they’re wrong, or by attacking “Republicans”. Find some other context in which to talk about the thing. If the specific topic gets defenses up easily, you may have a hard time finding a way to get at it.

Another thing that’s super important: Find out what they think. This part can be pretty painful if what they think is stupid or offensive, but there is nothing more useful to you than finding out. First, it gives you a better understanding of their view, and how they got to it, and where they might be going with it. Second, it makes them feel less attacked. I suspect I cannot stress nearly strongly enough the importance of letting them express their views, and asking them questions which cannot be attacks. Paraphrase to check your understanding, but if you’re about to offer a paraphrase, consider whether it could possibly be taken to be a hostile or dismissive view, and if it could, maybe try to find a friendlier presentation.

Your ideal goal, I think, should be that you can present their view on this issue well enough that they think you are presenting it well and exploring their arguments for it. Of course, if they hate the topic and are sick of it, well. Then you have a harder problem, and it may be that the answer is “you may not be able to get them to do this.” But a lot of the time, people aren’t hostile to the topic; they’re hostile to being told to change their minds.

Once you have that, you might be able to find ways to approach the topic that they will be more receptive to. If nothing else, if you’ve really listened to them, and not just immediately jumped on them with a counter, they may become curious as to your views. And they may actually listen to them, because they don’t want to be rude to you after you actually listened to their views. And you will also be better able to articulate specific points of difference. Perhaps most importantly, you may find that the points of difference are nowhere near where you thought they were. Very often, the things people are arguing about cannot be resolved because they are conclusions, and they were reached from different fundamental premises. Once you realize that someone doesn’t believe the world is 10,000 years old because they completely failed to understand radiometric dating, but because they don’t actually use the scientific method at all, you realize that no amount of arguing about radiometric dating will be relevant to them. (You might, however, have a chance with an argument based on discussing methods of understanding the Bible.)